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The Morning Brew: Pharmacists, other groups line up against Oklahoma medical marijuana question

Opponents claim law is written too broadly

File - Marijuana plants are for sale at Harborside marijuana dispensary, in this Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, file photo in Oakland, Calif. Manhattan's district attorney announced Tuesday that he would largely stop prosecuting people for possessing or smoking marijuana, a move he said was intended to help reduce racial inequities in the criminal justice system. The announcement by District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. came the same day that Mayor Bill de Blasio promised that the city's police department would overhaul its marijuana enforcement policies in the next 30 days. (AP Photo/Mathew Sumner, File)

A coalition of pharmacists, law enforcement officers and doctors have formed a political action committee to fend off State Question 788 which would if approved, would legalize medical marijuana in Oklahoma. The group called SQ 788 is Not Medical contends the law is written too broadly. 

Six weeks before a statewide vote, Oklahoma medical, law enforcement, business and religious groups announced a coalition on Tuesday to defeat the legalization of medical marijuana.

"This question is too broad and does not have the support of the medical community," said Dr. Kevin Taubman, immediate past-president of the Oklahoma State Medical Association and campaign chairman of the new coalition.

A statewide vote on the medical marijuana issue, State Question 788, is scheduled for the June 26 primary election ballot.

The name of the new organization, SQ 788 is Not Medical, zeros in on one of opponents' biggest criticisms of the proposed law change — that it would permit doctors to approve the licensing of marijuana use for practically any purpose.

Rather than identifying specific ailments for which marijuana can be prescribed, the proposed law says "there are no qualifying conditions."

The Oklahoma State Medical Association is listed as a member of the new coalition. So are such diverse groups as the Oklahoma Pharmacists Association, State Chamber of Oklahoma, Oklahoma Sheriffs' Association, Catholic Conference of Oklahoma and Oklahoma District Attorneys Association.

The coalition has formed a super PAC, a political action committee that can accept and spend unlimited campaign contributions.

More here.


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File - Marijuana plants are for sale at Harborside marijuana dispensary, in this Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, file photo in Oakland, Calif. Manhattan's district attorney announced Tuesday that he would largely stop prosecuting people for possessing or smoking marijuana, a move he said was intended to...

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-d663000eb73a8a94fb335e229b143777.jpg" alt="Photo - File - Marijuana plants are for sale at Harborside marijuana dispensary, in this Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, file photo in Oakland, Calif. Manhattan's district attorney announced Tuesday that he would largely stop prosecuting people for possessing or smoking marijuana, a move he said was intended to help reduce racial inequities in the criminal justice system. The announcement by District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. came the same day that Mayor Bill de Blasio promised that the city's police department would overhaul its marijuana enforcement policies in the next 30 days. (AP Photo/Mathew Sumner, File)" title="File - Marijuana plants are for sale at Harborside marijuana dispensary, in this Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, file photo in Oakland, Calif. Manhattan's district attorney announced Tuesday that he would largely stop prosecuting people for possessing or smoking marijuana, a move he said was intended to help reduce racial inequities in the criminal justice system. The announcement by District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. came the same day that Mayor Bill de Blasio promised that the city's police department would overhaul its marijuana enforcement policies in the next 30 days. (AP Photo/Mathew Sumner, File)"><figcaption>File - Marijuana plants are for sale at Harborside marijuana dispensary, in this Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, file photo in Oakland, Calif. Manhattan's district attorney announced Tuesday that he would largely stop prosecuting people for possessing or smoking marijuana, a move he said was intended to help reduce racial inequities in the criminal justice system. The announcement by District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. came the same day that Mayor Bill de Blasio promised that the city's police department would overhaul its marijuana enforcement policies in the next 30 days. (AP Photo/Mathew Sumner, File)</figcaption></figure>
Matt Patterson

Matt Patterson has been with The Oklahoman since 2006. Prior to joining the news staff in 2010, Patterson worked in The Oklahoman's sports department for five years. He previously worked at The... Read more ›

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